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Author Comment
Emma
Registered User
(11/23/05 10:56 am)
Fairy Tales influence women's perception of romantic love
I'm Psychology student doing my thesis on [b]Fairytales & how they influence young women's perception of romantic love[/b]. So far most of it is based on [u]Zipes book "Don't Bet on the Prince"[/u] & [u]Bettelheim's "The Uses of Enchantment[/u]" but I am having trouble finding literature or studies that might help me in my research. I was wondering if perhaps anyone could suggest a few of these books, research or places that I might look for any info relevant to my area of research.

Thanks in advance for your time :)

captainhaddockesq
Unregistered User
(11/23/05 2:15 pm)
Re Fairy tales and Romantic Love
Hi Emma,
I am new to fairy tales and so do not have a wide knowledge of them, but I am doing my dissertation on fairy tales and have found "Goodbye Sleeping Beauty. Breaking the Spell of Feminine Myths and Models." By Madonna Kolbenschlag, 1983, 0 905223 32 2, to be very useful. It has a chapter each on Sleeping Beauty, Snow White, Cinderella, Goldilocks and Beauty. And though there is no index reference to romantic love, there is to love, and she talks about various aspects of it all through the book.
Hope that helps, good luck with your work,
Frances:)

Writerpatrick
Registered User
(11/23/05 2:16 pm)
Re: Fairy Tales influence women's perception of romantic lov
Actually romance itself is suppose to be a creation of aristocratic medieval ladies. It was a set of "rules" used to selecting suitors (including those times when their husbands were away). So it could be argued that romance influenced the creation of fairy tales.

AliceCEB
Registered User
(11/23/05 4:18 pm)
Romance
More specifically, Eleanor of Aquitaine is credited with creating romance--she was stuck in a castle with a lot of young adults (male and female), had to find a way to keep them busy and so developed the rules. She encouraged troubadours, minstrels, musicians and storytellers of all kinds, which helped disseminate the romance stories. This was in addition, of course to leading a remarkable life as the wife of two kings and the mother of another two.

Best,
Alice

Erica Carlson
Registered User
(11/23/05 10:35 pm)
Re: Romance
It might be worth your while to look through the Women and fairy tales page on this site. Two of the books listed on that page are by Marie-Louise Von Franz, who works with fairy tales from a psychological perspective, but there may be other things there to interest you as well.

Best,
Erica

Don
Registered User
(11/24/05 10:42 am)
Re: Romance
In Fairy Tales and Feminism (Wayne State University Press, 2004), the first chaper, which surveys feminist fairy-tale scholarship, and the bibliography should help you zero in on studies related exactly to the topic you are writing on.

Rosemary Lake
Registered User
(11/25/05 5:33 am)
study of a group of women
I don't know if you want research starting at the other end -- with a group of women who held a particular view, and asking which fairytales they heard and identified with.

www.boloji.com/wfs3/wfs402.htm

This is the most thorough account I've seen of Darker-Smith's paper. It even gave figures from control group etc.

princessterribel
Registered User
(11/25/05 12:32 pm)
Re: study of a group of women
erm...I am not sure that it is correct to say that romance was created by the medieval aristocracy and females in particular. The romance tradition began with the medieval ideal of courtly love. This was a tradition begun by medieval writers/poets in france around about the 12th century onwards. This was the source of the iea behind romance and chivalry, the idea of a knights love for a lady. In truth this was far from the case...hehe, men, typical!

Chris Peltier
Registered User
(11/25/05 1:56 pm)
Re: study of a group of women
Actually. Eleanor of Aquitaine was credited with firming up the rules of courtly love, or courtesie, not Romance itself. According to Emilie Amt's book, Women's Lives in Medieval Europe:

"In other spheres of culture, however, noblewomen played a prominent role, serving as patrons and producers of music and poetry, shaping the codes of chivalry and courtly love, which softened the hard-working and unromantic lives of the nobility."

One of the finest and first known female writers in the romance tradition was Marie de France, who composed her lais in the late 12th century. The women is these stories are often plucky and resourceful, defiant in the face of unhappy marriages to older men, and who seek their own happiness with the lovers of their own choice.

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