Jataka Tales by Ellsworth Young

Jataka Tales by Ellen C. Babbitt

The Monkey and the Crocodile by Ellsworth Young

Jataka Tales
by Ellen C. Babbitt

Foreword and Publisher's Note

The Monkey and the Crocodile

How the Turtle Saved His Own Life

The Merchant of Seri

The Turtle Who Couldn't Stop Talking

The Ox Who Won the Forfeit

The Sandy Road

The Quarrel of the Quails

The Measure of Rice

The Foolish, Timid Rabbit

The Wise and Foolish Merchant

The Elephant Girly-Face

The Banyan Deer

The Princes and the Water-Sprite

The King's White Elephant

The Ox Who Never Envied the Pig

Grannie's Blackie

The Crab and the Crane

Why the Owl Is Not King of the Birds


More Jataka Tales
by Ellen C. Babbitt

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The Quarrel of the Quails

ONCE upon a time many quails lived together in a forest. The wisest of them all was their leader.

A man lived near the forest and earned his living by catching quails and selling them. Day after day he listened to the note of the leader calling the quails. By and by this man, the fowler, was able to call the quails together. Hearing the note the quails thought it was their leader who called.

When they were crowded together, the fowler threw his net over them and off he went into the town, where he soon sold all the quails that he had caught.

The wise leader saw the plan of the fowler for catching the quails. He called the birds to him and said, "This fowler is carrying away so many of us, we must put a stop to it. I have thought of a plan; it is this: The next time the fowler throws a net over you, each of you must put your head through one of the little holes in the net. Then all of you together must fly away to the nearest thorn-bush. You can leave the net on the thorn-bush and be free yourselves."

The quails said that was a very good plan and they would try it the next time the fowler threw the net over them.

The very next day the fowler carne and called them together. Then he threw the net over them. The quails lifted the net and flew away with it to the nearest thorn-bush where they left it. They flew back to their leader to tell him how well his plan had worked.

The fowler was busy until evening getting his net off the thorns and he went home empty-handed. The next day the same thing happened, and the next. His wife was angry because he did not bring home any money, but the fowler said, "The fact is those quails are working together now. The moment my net is over them, off they fly with it, leaving it on a thorn-bush. As soon as the quails begin to quarrel I shall be able to catch them."

Not long after this, one of the quails in alighting on their feeding ground, trod by accident on another's head. "Who trod on my head?" angrily cried the second. "I did; but I did n't mean to. Don't be angry," said the first quail, but the second quail was angry and said mean things.

Soon all the quails had taken sides in this quarrel. When the fowler came that day he flung his net over them, and this time instead of flying off with it, one side said, "Now, you lift the net," and the other side said, "Lift it yourself."

"You try to make us lift it all," said the quails on one side. "No, we don't!" said the others, "you begin and we will help," but neither side began.

So the quails quarreled, and while they were quarreling the fowler caught them all in his net. He took them to town and sold them for a good price.

Babbitt, Ellen C. Jataka Tales. Ellsworth Young, illustrator. New York: The Century Co., 1912.


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